Ecotricity

  • Ecotricity

Company information

Renewable progress

Founded in 1995 by green industrialist Dale Vince OBE, Ecotricity supplies almost 200,000 people with re-newable energy from its growing fleet of wind and sun parks.

“We focus on issues of sustainability, particularly across the three biggest sources of carbon emissions – energy, transport and food,” explains Dale. “We were the world’s first green energy company.”

Since the early days of its first windmill – which was built in 1996 with the aim of supplying Cheltenham and Gloucester College with electricity from landfill gas – Ecotricity has led the charge for sustainable energy development in Britain.

“The biggest opportunity for Ecotricity was the liberalisation of the energy market – without that we wouldn’t exist,” adds Dale. “That allowed us to offer a different kind of energy, the green kind.”

As a result, the company has kept innovating by expanding into electric vehicles, and installing charging points across the UK to create “Europe’s most comprehensive charging network”. Dale now plans to ex-pand that venture even further.

“We focus on issues of sustainability, particularly across the three biggest sources of carbon emissions – energy, transport and food”

“As a 21st century energy company, Ecotricity will all be about interconnectivity and a decentralised smart grid,” says the pioneer.

“We will expand the Electric Highway as electric vehicles replace the internal combustion car – and a big part of that will be powering transport with renewable energy, using home-scale battery storage and the interconnectivity between renewable energy, storage and transport.”

The environmental mission doesn’t end there, either. Ecotricity is currently looking at innovations within the water sector as well as how to make gas from grass – what Dale describes as the next big frontier.

  • 200,000 - People who receive renewable energy from Ecotricity's sun or wind parks

“The coming years will be all about technology enabling a very different energy grid, and the relationship between people and power,” he says. “The challenges will be climate change and the general unsustainability of how we live, while the opportu-nities will come from how technology and the green economy, solve these issues.”